Key Qualifying Questions for Commercial Real Estate Agents and Brokers

In commercial real estate brokerage you need to establish a good set of qualifying sales questions to understand how you can help a seller or landlord, and or a prospective buyer or tenant.  Those questions should help in matching your recommendations to the needs of the person that you are to serve.

So there are many different situations that we help with in commercial real estate brokerage.  They all require a special questioning process and a ‘checklist’ will help you stay on track and show your real professionalism as an agent.  Why do I say ‘checklist’?  Because many agents simply take a generic approach to qualification, and on that basis are quite similar to every other agent in doing so.  The ‘generic’ approach doesn’t work.  Be specific and special as you connect with your clients and prospects; be relevant and real as you qualify and connect.

So you must stand out as a ‘top agent’ of relevance and skill.  A ‘checklist’ aligned to the property type, client’s or prospects needs, and the location will help you here.  Here are some questions that can help you set up your checklist:

  1. Who are they?  Name, email, telephone, and cell phone will be required.
  2. What are they looking for in property today and why?
  3. How can you contact them in the future?  Get their agreement to that contact process.
  4. What have they seen by way of property or something else that has made them call or see you?
  5. What do they know about the local area?  Do they know the prices, rents, areas, or trends?
  6. Have they looked at properties with other agents?   If so, get the detail of where and when.
  7. What are the critical facts of property selection or listing that they must have satisfied?  What facts are driving those issues?
  8. Do they have a budget for a property choice and selection?  Check those details so you know that they are realistic in their intentions and choices.
  9. When must they have this property need satisfied?  Is there a time line that should be worked to?
  10. Do they have finance approved to help facilitate a decision or choice? (For property buyers).
  11. What do they know of the property type and will you need to help them with information specific to the situation?

So you can add to this list based on your location and the property.  Recognise the differences between sales, leasing, and property management as they all have special points of focus.

By using questions professionally in this way, you are setting up your competitors to fail in their pitch or presentation.  That’s a good idea, don’t you think?

1 Comment

  • Yolanda T Russo

    June 3, 2013

    Thank you for this simple reminder of due diligence and asking the right questions. I will be following your posts in the future. Thank you